Poached Pears in Osmanthus and Ginger Drink | Hong Kong Food Blog with Recipes, Cooking Tips mostly of Chinese and Asian styles | Taste Hong Kong

Poached Pears in Osmanthus and Ginger Drink

Candied Pear in Osmanthus and Ginger Drink

Preparing this dessert is already satisfying.

With its package only half-opened, the flowery fragrance from the dried osmanthus already masked me in seconds. The smell didn’t cease to waft up in my tiny kitchen after the flowers were thrown into the boiling water, also despite that the amount was only two tea spoons.

Pairing dried osmanthus and ginger was accidental, however, it was a pleasant accident when I happened to cook them with sticky rice dumplings and made them into a flavorful dessert. Ever since, I have been hooked.

Pear is a cooling food and ginger on the other hand is a heaty ingredient according to Chinese food therapy. Cooking them together therefore strikes a balance.

Amid such dry and cool weather, I know my body is loosing moist in and out. If moisturizer is a must, then we also have another good reason to eat this warming, nourishing dessert.

  • Ingredients
  • 2 pears
  • 2 tsp dried osmanthus
  • 30g rock sugar
  • 2 tsp grated ginger
  • 2 cups water

Dried Osmanthus in Bag

Method

Peel, core, slice pears, about 1cm thick.

Spread out dried osmanthus into a thin layer and remove any impurities or debris.

Briefly rinse osmanthus in a fine sieve, drain dry.

Bring 2 cups of water in a saucepan to a boil. Over medium heat, dissolve rock sugar in boiling water.

Add in osmanthus, grated ginger, and pear slices, having them all covered in the liquid.

Cover, turn to low heat, simmer for about 20 minutes. Serve the pears with the liquid both as a dessert and as a drink, preferably hot during winter.

Note
You may not want to chew something like tea dust (the boiled osmanthus and grated ginger) in you mouth , so it is better to strain the ginger soup before serving.

Dried osmanthus is a versatile ingredient, for making desserts like the popular Chinese ‘Goji Berries Osmanthus Jelly (杞子桂花糕)’ and for flavoring different drinks or even dishes. But I think I need another post to elaborate this intriguing dried flower. Let me do it soonest…


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Comments

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  1. penny aka jeroxie

    That wil be such subtle flavours :)

  2. Christine@Christine's Recipes

    The smell of dried osmanthus is very pleasant. No wonder many people like making all sorts of dessert with it, including me. :)

  3. pigpigscorner

    I had my first taste of osmanthus in HK, it was in jelly. yummy! Pairing with ginger is interesting.

  4. Angie's Recipes

    Don’t remember when I last had osmanthus….your osmanthus drink looks so delicious.

  5. Little Inbox

    I have sore throat these 2 days, this drink can heal me. :P

  6. TasteHongKong

    @Little Inbox,
    Take care! I wish this could help sooth you soar though not necessarily heal. If your symptom is caused by eating heaty foods, then you may want to omit adding the ginger, or try another recipe, Coriander Soup with Century Egg, posted here.
    Whichever, get well soon!

  7. Tastes of Home (Jen)

    I’ve never used osmanthus before but have heard good things, this looks so soothing :)

  8. Mei Teng

    I have soft spot for desserts. Have never tried this dessert before though. I love poached pears in red wine and served with ice cream.

  9. tigerfish

    I was just doing up a post and osmanthus is one of the ingredients. How I want your dessert now cos it is so dry here and I need more “moisture” intake and nourish!

    Maybe I can try to make this. Sounds easy. Thanks. :)

  10. Z.

    Once again a wonderful dish that reminds me of my childhood. Thanks for posting this :) [Am enjoying your vegetarian hot & sour soup right now!]

  11. 5 Star Foodie

    This looks like a amazing dessert! I’m not at all familiar with osmanthus, so I’m on my way to look it up :)

  12. TasteHongKong

    @Z,
    Am enjoying reading your kind feedback as well, and it is great to hear you enjoy the Hot and Sour Soup, thanks!

    @5 Star Foodie,
    Although I’m not sure where to locate the dried osmathus overseas, you may try shops selling Chinese teas. Good luck and enjoy!

  13. noobcook

    pears and osmanthus look like a winning combination. Your dessert soup looks so nourishing and tasty, I have to try it :)

  14. Von

    I love desserts which are good for you! =) This sounds delicious- I love pears cooked in anyway, but the combination of pear, ginger and osmanthus sounds really appealing!

  15. Mary Moh

    I haven’t tried osmanthus. Or may I have but never knew it…haha. The drink looks very refreshing and delicious. I like it.

  16. Juliana

    Wow, what a lovely and elegant dessert with pear…must taste so yummie. Perfect to finish a nice meal with :-) Love the pictures!

  17. yd

    Its been ages since I had this. I remember taking this (without the ginger) when having a heaty cough.

  18. gerard duguet-grasser

    hello
    i am a french writer, amoureux of chinese ( hong kong ) food, i do cook and i love your recipes, this simple appearance and beauty, as well as your comments and details all over, thank you ………… i like to talk a little more with you about it ? ……….. thank you, best regards … gerard

  19. TasteHongKong

    @gerard,
    Thanks!
    Sure, I am going to send you an email in a minute.

    Hi Everyone,
    I’d very much love to see you dropping by and leaving me your thoughts here. Or, you may also contact me via my email at tastehongkong[at]gmail[dot]com. Thanks!

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  22. Tan Lee Lian

    The smell of the osmanthus is simply heavenly in desserts or drinks!…simply add a little in a pot of tea and its smells refreshing